Monday, April 23, 2018

Five framed pictures for the BRDE exhibition

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 Rua Alvaro Ramos, Trindade, Florianopolis- motorcyclist 
oil on card, 12.5 x 14 cm, framed








 Alfredo Wagner, view from a hotel, oil on card, 15 x 16 cm, 2012, Framed






 Cusco- simple houses, oil on card, 15 x 13 cm, 2016, Framed







 São José, looking across  wasteland
 oil on card,13.5 x 11.5 cm, 2013, Framed






Alfredo Wagner, afternoon, houses
 oil on card, 14 x 14.5 cm, 2014, Framed




These frames are all okay, albeit perhaps on the slightly heavy side.





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Sunday, April 22, 2018

Framing for BRDE exhibition; discussion about framing

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 Near Anitapolis
 oil on card, 15 x 17.5 cm- framed





The paintings are framed- but some of the frames are too heavy for the paintings. This is especially apparent when they are hung on white walls. When hung on darker walls the heaviness is disguised.

I think the picture above is fine but others will have to be redone. Below, for instance, the frame appears to bully the painting-  though this is not really adequately conveyed in the photo below, alas-




Santo Amaro da Imperatriz, houses under construction
 oil on card , 11 x 13.5 cm - Framed









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Friday, April 20, 2018

Monotype; flowers; book on monotype

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 Flowers, monotype, 6.9 x 9.2 cm



There is a problem with using monotype as a travelling medium which is that to obtain the pressure necessary to transfer pigment a stable flat surface is necessary. But the equipment takes so little space that I shall take the required acetates and papers along to Uruguay anyway.








I recommend his book for those interested in Monotype. 

It's well illustrated with discussions on different media, presses and the history of the technique.

 Watson-Guptill Publications, New York, 2001




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Thursday, April 19, 2018

Nude; monotype; John Thomson

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Nude, monotype, 10.1 x 18 cm




I am pleased to announce my return to monotype. I may just do monotypes in Uruguay. Why not? I have bought a range of papers to experiment with. It is most important to have a sense of delight, of play, in artistic pursuits.  

And there is something about the way that monotype forces you to be rapid that liberates one. For every good result, however, there are three or four duds. 

The medium is limited, especially when it comes to creating spacial depth- though with a press you can get a wider tonal range and therefore suggest more depth. But I am hand pressing these and therefore effects I can achieve are less sophisticated.



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John Thomson




A Canton Junk





Following from the theme of travel and image-making- I came across the work of John Thomson, a Scottish photographer from the 19th century who went to China, Thailand and Cambodia.

I feel tremendous respect for Scottish culture of the Victorian period and early 20th century for producing so many adventurous and ambitious figures. Is this spirit still alive? 





Thomson with two Manchu soldiers, Xiamen, Fujian.





China and Siam: Through the Lens of John Thomson, can be seen  at the Brunei Gallery, London, until June 23. 



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Reclining woman 2

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Reclining woman 2, monotype, 10.8 x 18 cm












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Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Reclining woman

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Reclining woman, monotype, 9 x 12 cm











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Saturday, April 14, 2018

Cairo, monotype

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Cairo, monotype, 10.3 x 11.8 cm, 2011




This was made some years ago in Cairo and then forgotten about.


It was painted from the nice Bristol Hotel- completely empty except for myself and an obese American woman, heavily painted and in late middle-age (rather conceited, who was married to an Algerian in whose country she lived. She had worked as a dancer and I believe that this talent as well as her girth made her favourable to male Arab taste. She was enthusiastic about the military in Algeria, and seemed to lead a life of ease. But though she boasted of her lifestyle she wore a sour face and seemed miserable) and the ironical and elegant men who seemed to have no object other than to be amiable and who staff the place. This was during Egypt's hapless"revolution" and there were few tourists in the city.

The hotel was  calm amid the general hubbub and ghastliness of the city.




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